Part 2 – Clearwater Florida: What happens if there is no will?

Will and Living Will: Part 2 in a 3 part series from the Clearwater, Florida Law Firm of BaskinFleece.

If the decedent died intestate, the decedent’s probate assets will be distributed to the decedent’s heirs in the following order of priority:

1. If the decedent was survived by his or her spouse but left no living descendants, the surviving spouse receives all of the decedent’s probate estate. A “descendant” is a person in any generational level down the descending line from the decedent and includes children, grandchildren, and more remote descendants.

2. If the decedent was survived by his or her spouse and left one or more living descendants (all of whom are the descendants of both the decedent and his or her spouse), and the surviving spouse has no additional living descendants (who are not a descendant of the decedent), the surviving spouse receives all of the decedent’s probate estate.

3. If the decedent was survived by his or her spouse and left one or more living descendants (all of whom are the descendants of both the decedent and his or her spouse), but the surviving spouse has additional living descendants (at least one of whom is not also a descendant of the decedent), the surviving spouse receives one-half of the probate estate, and the decedent’s descendants share the remaining half.

4. If the decedent was not married at his or her death but was survived by one or more descendants, those descendants will receive all of the decedent’s probate estate. If there is more than one descendant, the decedent’s probate estate will be divided among them in the manner prescribed by Florida law. The division will occur at the generational level of the decedent’s children. So, for example, if one of the decedent’s children did not survive the decedent, and if the deceased child was survived by his or her own descendants, the share of the decedent’s estate which would have been distributed to the deceased child will instead be distributed among the descendants of the decedent’s deceased child.

Priorities 5 and 6 will be discussed in part 3.

For help or answers to estate related questions, you can contact BaskinFleece at 727.572.4545.

Some of the content of this information is courtesy of The Florida Bar and represents general legal advice. Because the law is continually changing, some provisions in this blog may be out of date. It is always best to consult an attorney about your legal rights and responsibilities in your particular case.
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One thought on “Part 2 – Clearwater Florida: What happens if there is no will?

  1. Pingback: Estate Planning: Probate Versus Trusts | BaskinFleece

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