BaskinFleece Proudly Announces That Attorney Colleen A. Carson Has Been Made a Partner

Colleen CarsonMs. Carson has been practicing at BaskinFleece in the areas of estate planning, corporate law, probate and trust administration, and guardianship administration since August of 2007.

In February 2014, Ms. Carson joined the Board of Directors for Lighthouse of Pinellas, a non-profit organization providing rehabilitation and training to blind and visually impaired individuals within the county.

She is the President of the Pinellas County Estate Planning Council and holds memberships in the St. Petersburg Bar Association, the Clearwater Bar Association, the Florida Bar Association, the Rotary Club of Clearwater at Feather Sound, and she is a Trustee for the Clearwater Bar Foundation. Ms. Carson was also named a Super Lawyer Rising Star in 2013.

To set up a consultation, call BaskinFleece at (727) 572-4545. For more information about BaskinFleece, visit BaskinFleece.com.

 

Colleen Carson
Colleen Carson: Tampa Bay Times
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Estate Planning: What Is Probate?

Why is probate necessary?


Estate planning and probate.Probate is necessary to pass ownership of the decedent’s probate assets to the decedent’s beneficiaries.
 If the decedent left a valid will, unless the will is admitted to probate in the court, it will be ineffective to pass ownership of probate assets to the decedent’s beneficiaries. If the decedent had no will, probate is necessary to pass ownership of the decedent’s probate assets to those persons who are to receive them under Florida law.

Probate is also necessary to wind up the decedent’s financial affairs after his or her death. Administration of the decedent’s estate ensures that the decedent’s creditors are paid if certain procedures are correctly followed.

The information above is courtesy of The Florida Bar and represents general legal advice. Because the law is continually changing, some provisions in this blog may be out of date. It is always best to consult an attorney about your legal rights and responsibilities in your particular case.
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No Personal Representative Arrangements Were Made?

Who can the court appoint as a personal representative?

If the decedent had a valid will, the judge will appoint the person or institution named by the decedent in his or her will to serve as personal representative, as long as the named person or bank or trust company is legally qualified to serve.

If the decedent had a valid will, the judge will appoint the person or institution named by the decedent in his or her will to serve as personal representative

Who will serve as the Personal Representative for the family will, if there is a will?

If the decedent did not have a valid will, the surviving spouse has the first right to be appointed by the judge to serve as personal representative. If the decedent was not married at his or her death, or if the decedent’s surviving spouse declines to serve, the person or institution selected by a majority in interest of the decedent’s heirs will have the second right to be appointed as personal representative. If the heirs cannot agree among themselves, the judge will appoint a personal representative after a hearing is held for that purpose.

Contact BaskinFleece at 727.572.4545.

Some of the content of this information is courtesy of The Florida Bar and represents general legal advice. Because the law is continually changing, some provisions in this blog may be out of date. It is always best to consult an attorney about your legal rights and responsibilities in your particular case.

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