The Difference between a DNR and a Living Will


A common misconception is that a Do Not Resuscitate Ord
er (DNR) and a Living Will are the same document. While both documents provide instructions to medical providers when you are unable to communicate your wishes regarding medical treatment, each document plays a different role in the administration of medical treatment to you.

The Difference Between a Living Will and a Do Not Resuscitate Order

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A Living Will is a written legal document prepared by you, with the assistance of your estate planning lawyer, stating your wishes regarding life-prolonging medical treatments. If you have a terminal condition, end-stage condition, or are in a persistent vegetative state, your Living Will specifies what life-prolonging medical treatment(s), if any, you wish to receive. A Living Will addresses whether you want medical treatments to prolong your life, such as a feeding tube, surgery, blood transfusions, and pain medicine.

A Do Not Resuscitate Order (DNR) is a medical order written by your doctor, instructing health care providers not to administer cardiopulmonary A Do Not Resuscitate Order (DNRO)resuscitation (CPR) if your heart stops beating or you stop breathing. The DNR is only a decision to withhold CPR and does not affect the administration of other medical treatments such as a feeding tube, surgery, blood transfusions, and pain medicine.

Not understanding the difference between a Living Will and a Do Not Resuscitate Order may inadvertently result in the administration of unwanted medical treatments or the withholding of desired medical treatments. It is recommended that you discuss the Living Will with your estate planning lawyer and the Do Not Resuscitate Order with your physician to effectively plan for your medical treatments.

For help or answers, you can contact BaskinFleece at 727.572.4545.

This blog is designed for general information only. The information presented at this site should not be construed to be formal legal advice nor the formation of a lawyer/client relationship. Because the law is continually changing, some provisions in this blog may be out of date. It is always best to consult an attorney about your legal rights and responsibilities in your particular case.

 

Include Digital Assets in Your Estate Planning

Make sure your digital assets are included in your estate planning document.

Digital AssetsExamples of Digital Assets that you need to properly plan for in estate planning or they could be lost:

  • On-line banking and investment accounts
  • Digital books
  • Purchased music
  • Games and apps on mobile devices
  • Family photos and videos stored in the cloud
  • Passwords to your Facebook page, blogs and other social media accounts.

The brief video below provides additional information about this topic.

For help or answers to estate-related questions, you can contact BaskinFleece at 727.572.4545.

This blog is designed for general information only. The information presented at this site should not be construed to be formal legal advice nor the formation of a lawyer/client relationship. Because the law is continually changing, some provisions in this blog may be out of date. It is always best to consult an attorney about your legal rights and responsibilities in your particular case.

April 1st – This Day in History

1789 Politics: The first U.S. House of Representatives formed and elected its first speaker.

April 1st US troops land on Okinawa1945 WWII: On this day, 50,000 U.S. combat troops of the 10th Army landed on Okinawa, 350 miles south of Kyushu, the southern main island of Japan.

The 1985 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament1985 College Basketball:
One of the greatest upsets in college basketball history, the Villanova Wildcats beat the Georgetown Hoyas, 66-64, to win the NCAA Men’s Division I tournament. The victory was Villanova’s first-ever national championship. Patrick Ewing played center on the losing Georgetown team.

Google introduces email2004 Internet: Google’s Gmail was launched as an advertising-supported email service provided by Google on an invitation-only beta release.

Jay Fleece and Hamden BaskinApril 1, 2004 Law: Joseph W. “Jay” Fleece, III, and Hamden H. Baskin, III, decided to combine their extensive knowledge and experience to create a unique law firm that was focused mainly on contested estate, trust and guardianship matters. Their philosophy was simple: leverage trial skills with the knowledge of probate and trust law to provide consistent, efficient and effective representation for their clients – resulting in positive outcomes. Congratulations to Jay Fleece, Hamden Baskin and their team for serving the community and its clients since 2004.

You can contact BaskinFleece at 727.572.4545.