Your Real Estate Transaction: 3 Main Benefits of Legal Representation

Attorney Randall D. Baskin

1. Before you sign the purchase and sale agreement: Whether you are the Buyer or the Seller, the need for attorney representation in a real estate transaction begins before you sign the purchase and sale agreement. While many real estate professionals claim to work with “standard contracts,”Personal representative compensation
there is no such thing as a standard contract. The boxes you fill in on those “standard contracts” can have a large impact on how costs associated with your real estate transaction are allocated between Buyer and Seller. For example, the contract will dictate which party will be obligated to pay any special assessments imposed upon the property that are due after closing. An attorney representing your best interests can provide advice on your contractual rights and obligations under a purchase and sale agreement before and after you sign on the dotted line.

Estate planning 2. During the escrow period: Once the purchase and sale agreement is signed, an attorney can help to ensure that your transaction goes smoothly by examining the title commitment to the property and by working to clear any clouds on the title that will affect your future use and enjoyment of the property.

Additionally, an attorney can advise on key issues affecting property ownership, such as choosing the right form of legal ownership and navigating the Florida Homestead Laws.

How ownership of property is taken can have vast legal consequences. When purchasing real estate, there are several ways to take legal title, such as jointly, individually, in a trust, or in a business entity. An attorney can analyze the facts of your particular situation and advise on which form of ownership is best for you.

The State of Florida affords unique legal protection to an individual’s real property through its Homestead Laws. An attorney can advise on Florida Homestead Laws and how to use these laws to protect your real property from liability, as well as how to maximize the tax benefits afforded to homestead property.

attorney real estate3. At closing: After all contingencies of the contract have been met, the closing can occur. At the closing table and after closing, an attorney will ensure that the transaction and all related documents are properly researched, executed, and recorded. If the property is in probate at the time of the sale, an attorney can help to ensure that the property is conveyed legally and all beneficiary interests in the property are extinguished.

For more information about real estate in St. Petersburg, Tampa, and Clearwater, call BaskinFleece at 727.572.4545.

This blog is designed for general information only. The information presented at this site should not be construed to be formal legal advice nor the formation of a lawyer/client relationship. Because the law is continually changing, some provisions in this blog may be out of date. It is always best to consult an attorney about your legal rights and responsibilities in your particular case.

 

Which emails in estate litigation are privileged?

Emails between estate attorneys and their client’s family have become one of the biggest discovery issues for litigators.

This video exposes which emails can be privileged, and which ones are not, and the pitfall for lawyers representing multiple family members in an estate. Mr. Baskin advises, “watch your e-mouth in documentation.” Click here to watch this important estate related video.

attorney lawyer privileged emails in litigation

Hamden Baskin speaking at a professional advisors seminar cautions about email communication between a lawyer and client that may used in estate litigation.

For help or answers to will and estate related questions, you can contact BaskinFleece at 727.572.4545.

It is always best to consult an attorney about your legal rights and responsibilities in your particular case.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Estate planning: Is a Will good forever?

probate,signing a will,trust estate

If you change your will due to a wide variety of reasons, make sure it is still a legal document.

Your will is “good” until it is changed or revoked in the manner required by Florida law. The will of your estate may be changed as often as you desire while you are sane and not under undue influence, duress, or fraud, provided it is changed in the required manner. Changes in circumstances after the execution of the will, such as tax law amendments, deaths, marriage, divorce, birth of children, or even a substantial change in the nature or amount of your estate, may raise questions as to the adequacy of your will. All changes require a careful analysis and reconsideration of all the provisions of your will and may make it advisable to change the will to conform to the new situation.

Because the law is continually changing, some provisions in this blog may be out of date. It is always best to consult an attorney about your legal rights and responsibilities in your particular case.

For help or answers to will and estate related questions, you can contact BaskinFleece at 727.572.4545.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Is Your Will Official? Here are technicalities that could make it invalid…

A Will is a written document controlling the disposition of estate assets and cash at death. The laws of each state set the formal requirements for a wIll to be a legal will. Here are the laws in Florida regarding an official and valid will:

will and estate

Make sure your will is official.

1. The maker of the will (called the testator), must be at least 18 years old.

2. The testator must be of sound mind at the time they sign the will.

3. The will must be written to be an official document.

4. Important: The will must be witnessed and notarized in the special manner provided by law for wills.

5. It is necessary to follow exactly the formalities required for the execution of a will.

6. To be effective, the will must be proved in, and allowed by, the probate court.

Click on the image below to watch a short 1 minute video.

The Signing of a WillNo will becomes final until the death of the testator, and it may be changed or added to by the testator by drawing a new will or by a “codicil,” which is simply an addition or amendment executed with the same formalities of a will. A will’s terms cannot be changed by writing something in or crossing something out after the will is executed. In fact, writing on the will after its execution may invalidate part of the will or all of it.

Some of the content of this information is courtesy of The Florida Bar and represents general legal advice. Because the law is continually changing, some provisions in this blog may be out of date. It is always best to consult an attorney about your legal rights and responsibilities in your particular case.

For help or answers to will and estate related questions, you can contact BaskinFleece at 727.572.4545.
Enhanced by Zemanta